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Low oxalate diet

by Diane K. Newman, DNP, FAAN, BCB-PMD

Oxalates in food can be important to know if you are following a low oxalate diet to reduce vulvodynia or chronic pelvic pain symptoms.

There are few resources that publish a comprehensive list of foods with their exact oxalate content. We offer the following oxalate content in foods list that shows comparisons between low, medium and high oxalate fruits, vegetables, meats, dairy foods, oils, starches, beverages and miscellaneous items. Be sure to scroll to the bottom to see the foods high in oxalatess. Use the list as a guide to choosing foods when you are trying a low-oxalate diet.

 See also Patient Tip Sheets:

Low Oxalate Foods

Foods Little or No Oxalate
Eat as desired
Fruits Avocado
Cherries
Grapefruit
Grapes, (Thompson seedless)
Mangoes
Melons
Cantaloupes
Casaba
Honeydew Melon
Watermelon
Nectarines
Peaches,
Plums, green or
golden eye
Vegetables Avocado
Brussels sprouts
Cauliflower
Cabbage
Mushrooms
Onions
Peas, green
Potatoes (Irish)
Radishes
Meat Group  
Milk Buttermilk
Low-fat milk
Low-fat yogurt with allowed fruits
Skim milk
Fats and Oils Bacon
Mayonnaise
Salad dressing
Vegetable oils
Miscellaneous Jelly or Preserves
(made with allowed fruits)
Lemons
Salt, pepper (1tsp/day)
Soups with allowed
Ingredients
Bread/Starch Cornflakes
Macaroni
Noodle
Oatmeal
Rice
Spaghetti
White bread
Beverage/
Juices
Apple juice
Coca-cola (12 oz) (limit/ day)
Distilled Alcohol
Grapefruit juice
Lemonade or Limeade without peel
Wine, red, rose
Pepsi-Cola (12 oz) (limit/ day)
Pineapple juice
Tap water (preferred for extra calcium)

Moderate and High Oxalate Foods

Food Moderate Oxalate:
2-10 Oxalate/Serving;
Limit: 2 (1/2 Cups) Servings per day
Rich Oxalate:
> 1 Oxalate/Serving;
Avoid completely
Fruits Apple
Apricots
Black currants
Cherries, red
Orange, edible portion
Peaches, Alberta
Pears
Pineapple
Plums, Damson
Prunes, Italian
Blackberries
Blueberries
Concord grapes
Red currants
Dewberries
Fruit cocktail
Gooseberries
Lemon peel
Lime peel
Orange peel
Raspberries
Rhubarb
Strawberries
Tangerines
Vegetables

Asparagus
Broccoli
Carrots
Corn, Sweet white, sweet yellow
Cucumber, peeled
Green peas, canned
Lettuce, Iceber
Lima beans
Parsnips
Tomato, 1 small
Turnips

Beans - Green, Wax,
Dried Beets
Tops, Roots, Greens
Celery
Chard, Swiss Chive
Collards
Dandelion greens
Eggplant
Escarole
Kale
Leeks
Mustard Greens
Okra
Parsley
Peppers, Green
Pokeweed
Potatoes, sweet
Rutabagas
Spinach
Summer squash
Watercress
Meat Group Sardines Baked beans
Peanut butter
Soybean curd - (Tofu)
Milk    
Fats and Oils   Nuts:
Peanuts
Pecans
Miscellaneous Chicken noodle soup dehydrated Chocolate, cocoa
Pepper (in excess
of 1 tsp/day)
Vegetable soup
Tomato soup
Bread/Starch

Cornbread
Sponge cake
Spaghetti, canned in tomato sauce

Fruit cake
Grits, white corn
Soybean crackers
Wheat Germ
Beverage/Juices Coffee, any kind (9 oz. serving)
Cranberry juice (4 oz.)
Grape juice (4 oz.)
Orange juice (4 oz.)
Tomato juice (4 oz.)
Nescafe power
Beer
Juices containing berries not allowed
Ovaltine and other mixed beverage mixes
Tea, cocoa

Adapted from Newman, DK. (2000) "Pelvic Disorders in Women: Chronic Pelvic Pain and Vulvodynia". OstomyWound Management: December 46(12): 48-54.

A low oxalate diet has helped some women with pelvic pain and vulvodynia.

References

Baker, PK. (1993) Musculoskeletal Origins of Chronic Pelvic Pain. Contemporary Management of Chronic Pelvic Pain, 20(4) December:719-742.05-227.

Duleba, A.J., Keltz, M.D., Olive, D.L. (1996) Evaluation and Management of Chronic Pelvic Pain. Journal American Association Gynecologic Laparoscopists, February 1996, 3 (2), 205-227.

Glazer,H.I.,Rodke,G.,Swencionis,C., Hertz,R.,Young,A.W.(2000) "Treatment of Vulvar Vestibulitis Syndrome with Electromyographic Biofeedback of Pelvic Floor Musculature". Journal of Reproductive Medicine, 40(4),11 pp.

Metts, J.F. (1999) Vulvodynia and Vulvar Vestibulitis: Challenges in Diagnosis and Management. American Family Physician, 59(6),1547-1556.

Newman, DK. (2000) "Pelvic Disorders in Women: Chronic Pelvic Pain and Vulvodynia". OstomyWound Management: December 46(12): 48-54.

Paavonen, J. (1995) "Vulvodynia - a complex syndrome of vulvar pain". Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 74,243-247.

Steege,J.F. (1997) Office Assessment of Chronic Pelvic Pain. Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol.40(3),554-563.

Steege,J.F.,Metzger,D.A.,Levy, B.S. (1998) Chronic Pelvic Pain: An Integrated Approach. W.B.Saunders,Philadelphia, PA.

Yount,J.J., Solomons, C.C.,Willems, J.J., St. Amand, R.P. (1997) "Effective Nonsurgical Treatments for Vulvar Pain". Women's Health Digest, 3(2),88-93.

Posted October 2007
Updated March 2013


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